Briquetting

Briquette making exemplifies the potential of appropriate technology. It saves trees and prevents problems like soil erosion and desertification by providing an alternative to burning wood for heating and cooking. It substitutes agricultural waste like hulls, husks, corn stocks, grass, leaves, food and animal garbage for a valuable resource. It improves health by providing a cleaner burning fuel. This is dramatically true in areas like Adjara, where cattle dung in many cases is used for heating and cooking. And in these situations, it also improves agriculture by preserving the dung for pastures and gardens instead of letting it all go up in smoke (and into people's lungs and eyes). The briquettes are also designed for holding, growing, and protecting seedlings. It tackles the problem on both ends by giving a better alternative to firewood (40% more efficient, 23% longer burning, and 18% hotter than fire-wood). At the same time as creating the above benefits, briquetting engenders many micro enterprise opportunities: making the presses from locally available materials, supplying materials and making the briquettes, selling and delivering the briquettes. The same device is also used/can be used for production of biodegradable seedling pots that significantly improve the yields of crops. The briquette presses can be/are constructed from locally available materials and are cost efficient. 

The briquette presses are successfully used in 11 communities of Georgia.

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